The Rockies Fireworks Show: Everything You Need to Know


Rockies Fireworks Show

The 4th of July is one of the best times of the year and one thing that makes this holiday special are all the different firework shows. As someone who has lived around Denver for most of his life, my favorite spot for a fireworks show is the one that happens at Coors Field, directly after a night game. I’ve been to this show a handful of times so I figured I would put together this short guide for anyone who is in the Denver area for the 4th of July and wants to know if Coors Field has fireworks.

Traditionally, Coors Field does a handful of firework shows each year. Every year, the Rockies will host 2 evening games on or around the 4th of July and another evening game sometime in September, where a fireworks show will begin about 20 to 30 minutes after the conclusion of the game.

The Rockies fireworks show is easily one of the best fireworks show in the Denver area, especially if you’re a baseball fan. In this guide, we’ll go over everything from how long the show lasts, to where you should sit, and how you can be one of the fans that get to watch the fireworks show from the Rockies’ outfield.

When Do the Rockies Have Firework Shows?

Rockies Fireworks Show (2)

While most people associate the Rockies’ fireworks show with the 4th of July, there is at least one other game in the season where the Rockies also have a fireworks show. Let’s go over all of those times when the Rockies will have a fireworks show, starting with the most well-known Rockies fireworks show.

Coors Field Firework Shows Around the 4th of July

Every year, the Rockies will play 2 home games that occur on or around the 4th of July. Each of these games is scheduled to begin in the evening. This way when the game ends, it’s dark and fans can enjoy a much better viewing experience of the fireworks show.

Sometimes the Rockies have a game that lands directly on the 4th of July and sometimes they don’t. But the good news is that they usually host 2 games where they have the exact same fireworks show.

If you’re hoping for a game that lands directly on the 4th of July, it’s best to check the Rockies schedule to see if they have a home game that lands on the 4th of July. Or you can look at the Rockies’ “Fireworks Games” page to see what dates they have tickets available.

Fan Appreciation Fireworks in September

One thing that most fans are not aware of is that the Rockies have fireworks shows that occur on dates other than the 4th of July.

Every year, the Rockies typically host one “Fan Appreciation Fireworks” game towards the end of September. This fireworks show is very similar to the fireworks show that occurs around the 4th of July.

While the exact dates for the Fan Appreciation Fireworks games are hard to predict from year-to-year, they mainly happen towards the end of September. However, the Rockies do have a “Fireworks Games” page that you can visit to see what days they are planning on hosting a fireworks show.

The Fireworks Show is Roughly 12 Minutes Long

While it’s always exciting to see a fireworks show, the one question people always want to know is – how long is the Rockies firework show?

Each Rockies firework show is roughly 12 minutes long. The firework show begins with a countdown on the jumbotron and ends with the grand finale about 12 minutes later.

I’ve been to a handful of Rockies fireworks shows and I remember them being somewhere between 10-15 minutes in length. But after comparing my experience to the numerous YouTube videos that are out there, it’s very clear that the fireworks show lasts almost 12 minutes.

While the show itself is about 12 minutes long, it does take about 20 to 30 minutes to get the stadium ready for fireworks. After the game ends, the ushers need to clear certain sections in the outfield so fans can enjoy the fireworks show from the field, and that usually takes 20 to 30 minutes.

The Best Seats to See Fireworks are on the First Base Side or on the Field

With the capacity of Coors Field being just over 50,000 seats (if you include standing room), you’ll want to know where to purchase your tickets. What are the best seats for Coors Field fireworks?

The best seats for the Rockies fireworks show is a seat located down the first base line, facing left field. However, a lot of fans enjoy purchasing tickets that allow them to be on the field during the fireworks show.

When purchasing tickets for the fireworks show, remember that you’ll be looking towards left field to see the fireworks. The fireworks will all be located above the main scoreboard.

If you’re looking for an actual seat to enjoy the fireworks, consider getting one of the seats down the first baseline. The top section of the stadium probably has the very best view of the fireworks, but any seat that is facing toward left field will allow you to watch the fireworks without turning your head.

If you’re looking forward to sitting on the grass to watch fireworks, consider purchasing one of the tickets that allows you access to the field after the game. It’s easy enough to bring a blanket with you so you have something comfortable to sit on while you’re watching the show from the same outfield the Rockies just played on.

What Sections go on the Field for Rockies Fireworks?

Rockies Fans on Field Waiting for Fireworks Show

The sections of Coors Field that go onto the field to watch the fireworks are the sections located in left field and center field. In left field, these would be sections 148 – 160. In center field, these would be sections 401 – 403, also known as the “Rockpile”.

And as you can see from my photo, these sections are completely cleared out and all of those fans were let onto the field.

When you’re on the field, there is no assigned seating. It’s a first-come-first-serve basis so make sure you pick your spot quickly.

If you’re on the field and you’re wanting to be one of the first people to leave after the fireworks show, try to sit somewhere in left field. There is a large opening around the left-field foul pole where they left fans in and out of the field.

There are Obstructed View Tickets Available

While I don’t have experience with these obstructed view tickets, the Rockies do offer a deal for people who want to have a great viewing experience of the game, but will have an obstructed view of the fireworks show.

These tickets are generally cheaper than other tickets, but people who purchase these tickets will not be able to see the fireworks show because of an overhang.

So if you purchase obstructed view tickets, you’ll need to move to another location to view the fireworks show. And to make matters worse, these tickets do not allow you access to the field to watch the game.

If you want to see what kind of deals they have available, go to the Rockies’ “Fireworks Games” page and scroll to the obstructed view section.

But if it were up to me, I would try to get Rockpile tickets before I got any obstructed view tickets. Rockpile tickets are the cheapest seats available at Coors Field and people who are in the Rockpile are allowed to go onto the field to watch the fireworks show.

The Grand Finale is Insane

No fireworks show is complete without a grand finale and the Rockies know exactly how to have a grand finale. The entire firework show is great, but then you get to the final minute and things really start to pick up. Trust me, this is a grand finale worth watching.

Traffic Will be Bad

The firework show at Coors Field is a special event that everyone sticks around to watch. Not only are the 50,000+ fans staying at the game to watch the show, there are also tons of people around the stadium that have gathered to watch fireworks. All the restaurants and bars will most likely be full in anticipation of the fireworks show.

So remember that after the fireworks show ends, there will be a lot more traffic than you’d see at the end of any normal baseball game.

Steve Nelson

I'm the owner of Baseball Training World. I live in Denver, Colorado and I enjoy playing baseball on two different adult baseball teams in the surrounding area.

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